A frequent question when considering egg freezing is “How many eggs would be a good goal for me?” In truth, any number of eggs will give you a higher chance of conceiving in the future compared with no frozen eggs at all.

At the same time, there is no number of frozen eggs that will be able to guarantee a future live birth. The likelihood of having a baby with frozen eggs in the future depends on many factors, the most important of which are your age at the time the eggs are frozen and the total number of eggs. With an estimated 2–10% chance of live birth per egg, success rates go up as egg numbers go up. And since female age is the main predictor of fertility, success rates are highest in women who freeze eggs when they are younger.

The chart below shows an estimated likelihood of having a baby in the future depending on how many eggs are frozen now, categorized by age. For example, if a 34-year-old woman froze 20 eggs, then the likelihood of a future pregnancy from those eggs in the future, is estimated around 70%. It may take more than one cycle to achieve your goal number of eggs, particularly if you are older. Also, most eggs do not make viable embryos, and the percentage of genetically normal embryos declines with age. More eggs frozen now will lead to more embryos available for potential future transfer.

Component: Data Table Block

Predicted Percent Chance of Pregnancy


# of eggs frozenProjected #
of embryos
Age
<30
Age
30-34
Age
35-37
Age
38-40
Age
41-42
Age
43-44
5 to 10 1 to 2 50% 50% 40%30% 20% 10%
11 to 15 2 to 4 60% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%
16 to 20 3 to 6 70% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30%
21 to 30 4 to 8 75% 75%65% 55% 45% 35%

% of genetically normal
embryos
65%60% 50% 40% 25%15%
# of eggs frozen Projected #
of embryos
Age
<30
Age
30-34
Age
35-37
Age
38-40
Age
41-42
Age
43-44
5 to 10 1 to 2 50% 50% 40%30% 20% 10%
11 to 15 2 to 4 60% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%
16 to 20 3 to 6 70% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30%
21 to 30 4 to 8 75% 75%65% 55% 45% 35%

% of genetically normal
embryos
65%60% 50% 40% 25%15%