Balkwill, Fran & Rolph, Mics. (2002) HAVE A NICE DNA. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
A great introduction to genetics. Clear explanations of DNA with great and funny illustrations. A good place to begin conversations about genetics; can be used with children of all ages. Part of a series of science books.

Bernstein, Anne. (1994) Flight of the Stork: What Children Think (and when) About Sex and Family Building. 287 p. Indianapolis: Perspectives Press.
Available through www.perspectivespress.com. Enlightening interviews with children aged 3-12 provides insight into the minds of young children and how their concepts and questions about sex and reproduction change over time. This updated version includes references to donor insemination, assisted reproductive technology, and surrogacy. Valuable resource for parents for talking with their children about the special circumstances of their origins.

Cooper, S. and Glazer, E. (1999) CHOOSING ASSISTED REPRODUCTION: SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL, AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS. Indianapolis: Perspectives Press. 400p.
Available through www.perspectivespress.com. Comprehensive overview of IVF, GIFT, ZIFT, ICSI, ovum donation, sperm donation, surrogacy, gestational care, and embryo donation helps fertility patients think through the psychological, social, and ethical implications of these procedures. Suggestions on how and when to tell children about their origins are included.

Daniels, Ken. (2004) Dunmore Press. BUILDING A FAMILY WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF DONOR INSEMINATION

Ehrensaft, Diane. (2005) MOMMIES, DADDIES, DONORS, SURROGATES: ANSWERING TOUGH QUESTIONS AND BUILDING STRONG FAMILIES. Guilford Press.
Highly comprehensive book on the different issues faced by families of third party reproductive technology. Excellent sections on how, when, and what to tell your children. Written for both a professional and a general audience, this comprehensive book includes clinical material.

Friedman, J.S. (1996) BUILDING YOUR FAMILY THROUGH EGG DONATION–WHAT YOU WILL WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE EMOTIONAL ASPECTS, BONDING, AND DISCLOSURE ISSUES. Kentucky: Jolance Press.
This book is available through the author.

Glazer, Ellen. (2005) HAVING YOUR BABY THROUGH EGG DONATION. Indianapolis: Perspectives Press.
Available through www.perspectivespress.com. A very thorough exploration of the medical, ethical, and psychological aspects of egg donation, including sections on how, when, and who to tell.

Glazer, Ellen. (1998) THE LONG AWAITED STORK: A GUIDE TO PARENTING AFTER INFERTILITY. Jossey Bass Press.
One of a kind resources for parenting after infertility including sections on what (and when) to tell your child about their conception and/or birth, who else to tell, and how to handle lingering feelings of loss. Appropriate for parents of adopted children; sperm donor, egg donor parents; parents who used surrogates; parents of special needs kids; and parents raising children conceived in different ways.

Harris, Robie H. (2006) ITS NOT THE STORK: A BOOK ABOUT GIRLS, BOYS, BABIES, BODIES, FAMILIES, AND FRIENDS. Candlewick Press.
Great book for sex education. Lively illustrations and easy text appropriate to read to young children, or for older children to read to themselves. Includes mention of IVF and parents can add information about donor gametes and surrogacy as they read.

Lorbach, Caroline. (2003) EXPERIENCES OF DONOR CONCEPTION; PARENTS, OFFSPRING, AND DONORS THROUGH THE YEARS. New Zealand: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Exploration of assisted conception (egg donation, sperm donation, embryo donation), which draws heavily on firsthand experiences of parents, offspring and donors and includes the author’s own family story. Special emphasis on how and when to tell children and real-life examples of family’s experiences. Strongly supportive of openness with children.

Pettle, S. and J. Burns. CHOOSING TO BE OPEN: THE EXPERIENCES OF PARENTS. Donor Conception Network, U.K.
Available through www.dcnetwork.org. Short book consisting of conversations with 52 parents who participated in group discussions to talk about their experiences being open about donor conception.